Published September 1, 2016

Table of Contents

Autumn 2016: Vol. XXXIV, No. 4 (Whole Number 198)

Military Images
Published September 1, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Editor’s Desk

A Rare Image of Historical Significance

The editor discusses images of historical significance. He highlights the albumen photograph of African American soldiers at L’Overture Hospital in Alexandria, Va., and describes it as one of the most historically significant Civil War images to surface in recent times.
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published September 1, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Passing in Review

Civil War Hard Images by Christopher Anderson and Ben L. Pauley (SoldierCollectibles.com)

A unique 6-point scoring system grades images in Civil War Hard Images by Christopher Anderson and Ben L. Pauley (SoldierCollectibles.com).
Military Images
Published September 1, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Honored Few

Medal of Honor Recipient  1st Sgt. Joseph Bell Kemp, 5th Michigan Infantry

1st Sgt. Joseph Bell Kemp found himself relatively alone during the Battle of The Wilderness after his comrades on the left and right fell. Kemp glimpsed three Confederates in front of him, and the personal encounter that followed ended with Kemp in possession of a rebel flag—end eventually the Medal of Honor.
Military Images
Published September 1, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Photo Sleuth

How a “Concurrent Service Timeline” Helped Solve the Mystery of a Group Portrait Identification

Identifying a Civil War soldier in an individual portrait can be tricky enough. But for advanced photo sleuths, sorting out multiple soldiers in a group portrait poses unique challenges. Kurt describes how he used a concurrent service timeline to help discover the identities of six staff officers who served in the 64th Illinois Infantry.
By Kurt Luther
Published August 31, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Following the Colors on James Island

A Teenaged Captain in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Proves his Valor

Young patriots enlisted in the Union army for a variety of reasons. But for one 16-year-old boy, Cabot Jackson Russell, the moment of decision came after he learned that one of his cousins had been killed in battle. Russell would go on to enlist in the 44th Massachusetts Infantry, and later become an officer in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry. His tenure in the 54th was short-lived. On July 18, 1863, he was killed along with Col. Robert Gould Shaw and other men in the failed assault against the garrison of Fort Wagner, S.C.
By Scott Valentine
Published August 31, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Antebellum Warriors

Mexican War, Regulars & Militias

One of the “master spirits” of the war.
Military Images
Published August 31, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Colts, Knives and Cigars

An exclusive selection of portraits adapted from Civil War Hard Images by Christopher Anderson and Ben L. Pauley

Military Images
Published August 31, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The American Zouave

Mania and Mystique

“During the Civil War, Union and Confederate troops both adopted exotic dress in the transgressive guise of the Zouave uniform,” observes Marr. He goes on to explore the cultural phenomenon that excited and energized Americans before and during the war.
By Timothy Marr
Published August 30, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Natty Glory

Zouaves from the Dan Miller collection

A total of 19 representative portraits from Miller’s extensive collection features Zouaves from across the Northern states. Identified images include Cpl. Joseph Hughes of Duryée’s Zouaves (165th New York Infantry), Sgt. Augustus Wright of the Burnside Zouaves (1st Rhode Island National Guard), Pvt. Lucien Barnes of the Albany Zouave Cadets (10th New York State Militia), 2nd Lt. Winfield Scott Tefft, Capt. Fredrick Ullman Jr., 1st Lt. Louis A. Cowell, Sgt. Francis Richard “Frank” Kelley and Pvt. Horace Knapp of the Racine Zouave Cadets of Wisconsin, and Capt. John J. Babcock of the 14th New York Infantry.
Military Images
Published August 30, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Freedmen Warriors, Civil Rights Fighters

Was this the burial detail that protested orders and refused to bury one of their own in a civilian cemetery?

An unusual albumen portrait of 11 U.S. Colored Infantrymen and a chaplain begs a question: Were these men the burial detail that protested orders and refused to bury one of their own in a civilian cemetery? After exhaustive research, the author places the men at L’Overture Hospital in Alexandria, Va., after the Battle of the Crater and shares his theory. The men in the albumen portrait are all identified. Crater casualties include Adam Bentley, Adolphus Harp of the 19th, Jerry Lisle of the 28th, Leander Brown and Stephen Vance of the 30th, George H. Smith and Tobias Trout of the 31st. Other soldiers include Samuel Bond of the 19th, William DeGraff of the 22nd, Robert Deyo of the 26th, John H. Johnson of the 27th, and Chaplain Chauncey Leonard. A separate portrait of Frank Snow, a U.S. Christian Commission volunteer who owned the photograph, is also included.
By Charles Joyce
Published August 30, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

A Duel to the Death

The suspicious death of an Iowa colonel catapults a subordinate to command before Iuka

William H. Worthington was admired by his superiors and despised by his men in the 5th Iowa Infantry. His untimely death on the picket line prompted a shakeup in the regiment that ended with Prussian-born and military educated Charles Leopold Matthies in command. He led his men out of a tight spot at the Battle of Iuka and other engagements. Illustrated with a portrait of Matthies with two of his subordinates, Maj. William S. Robertson and Adj. Robert F. Patterson.
By Brian Boeve
Published August 30, 2016

Uniforms & History

Photos, a Lithograph and the Raucous 1st Cavalry

Mike introduces readers to a unique photograph of a lithograph of the 1st Regiment Cavalry, New York State Militia. Col. Thomas C. Devin commanded the regiment.
By Michael J. McAfee
Published August 29, 2016

Shattered Wall of Blue

At Cedar Mountain and beyond, a Pennsylvania officer fights his way through infamous Civil War battles

If Lt. Alexander W. Selfridge had a moment to take in what was about to happen to his company at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, it was probably fleeting. Selfridge and his men belonged to Company F of the 46th Pennsylvania Infantry, and they would have a tough go of it at Cedar Mountain, They would survive the heavy fighting and participate in numerous other engagements. Illustrated with a portrait of Selfridge and two of his subordinates, lieutenants Orlando J. Rees and Merrick Jackson.
By Ben Myers
Published August 29, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

First Look at the Confederate President and Commander-In-Chief

The image that introduced Southerners to their new leader

The photograph gallery of New Yorker Mathew B. Brady took the portrait that introduced Southerners to their new leader. The likeness was pasted to countless cartes de visite and featured on a badge designed by John H. Fitzgibbon of St. Louis, Mo.
Military Images
Published August 29, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Stragglers

Distinctive images from MI contributors

Included in this issue is a group of musicians in the 26th New York Infantry, a man dressed as “Brother Jonathan,” two portraits of a young African American who may have been a slave, servant and soldier, and a Confederate who appears to be from the Trans-Mississippi region of the war.
Military Images
Published August 29, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Love of His Life

Capt. John Faunce and the Harriet Lane

John Faunce served as the original commander of the Harriet Lane, the modern U.S. Revenue Service cutter named for President James Buchanan’s comely niece. Faunce found himself and his ship in Charleston Harbor when Fort Sumter was bombarded. Though he was eventually separated from the beloved Lane, he eventually returned to save her from a sad fate in the faraway Cuban port of Havana.
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published August 29, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Last Shot

Comforting Spirit

Two cartes de visite of John Huey Weeks, an officer in the 91st Pennsylvania Infantry and the Veteran Reserve Corps, picture him with head bowed over a table. In one of the portraits can be seen the faint image of a young woman—a spirit photograph.
Military Images
Published June 4, 2016

Table of Contents

Summer 2016: Vol. XXXIV, No. 3 (Whole Number 197)

Military Images
Published June 4, 2016

Welcome to Military Images magazine

Military Images magazine was established in 1979 to document portrait photographs of early American citizen soldiers and sailors. MI's ongoing mission is to showcase, interpret and preserve this unique photographs.
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Editor’s Desk

The Enduring Legacy of Gettysburg

The furious fighting in and about a bustling crossroads village in Pennsylvania for three days in July 1863 is Homeric in its scope. Every patch of hallowed ground on the battlefield of Gettysburg is mythological in its proportions.
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Passing in Review

The Union Soldier: Images of the Civil War by Bruce Bonfield

George Marsh stares at the camera with an expression that suggests a contemplative person, who, perhaps, also possesses a dash of the mischievous, with an oversize bowtie framing his clean-shaven face. His portrait photograph resembles countless others inserted into fashionable carte de visite albums during the war. What makes this image quite unique is a newspaper clipping pasted below his likeness. It reads, in part, “He was lying on the ground when a ball entered the ground in front of him and came out of the earth a few feet from where he lay. The concussion caused his death, as he was not hit by any thing.”
Military Images
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Honored Few

Medal of Honor Recipient Wheelock Graves Veazey, 16th Vermont Infantry

At Gettysburg, Veazey and his men passed by wounded Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock just before they struck the Confederates. Hancock reportedly said to Veazey, “That’s right, Colonel, go in and give ‘em hell on the flank.”
Military Images
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Photo Sleuth

The Value of Photo Inscriptions as an Identification Tool

Investigating the value of photo inscriptions, and in particular family connections, in identifying Civil War soldier portraits.
By Kurt Luther
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Finding My Great-Grandfather

A tintype of Cpl. John Langhans comes home

Military Images
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

CARDOMANIA!

How the carte de visite became the Facebook of the 1860s

Military Images
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Jefferson Davis, Political Soldier

How a New York photographer captured Davis in uniform

Military Images
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Antebellum Warriors

Mexican War, Regulars & Militias

A Militiaman of a different stripe.
Military Images
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Gettysburg’s Honored Dead, Haunted Survivors

Portraits and stories of citizen soldiers with an introduction by Harold Holzer

Military Images
Published June 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Final Harvest

The last journey of a Confederate lieutenant wounded and captured at Pickett’s Charge

By Charles Joyce
Published June 3, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

A Gallant Son of Orange Falls at Gettysburg

In the aftermath of battle, a Pennsylvania farmwife fulfills a Union captain’s foreboding request

By Ronald S. Coddington
Published June 3, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Return and Retreat at Gettysburg

A seminarian is called to arms to defend his college town

By Paul Russinoff
Published June 3, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Immortality on Little Round Top, Butchery in Saunders Field

Two New York officers and the harsh reality of war

By Kevin Canberg
Published June 2, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Conspicuous Cadet at New Market

The life and legacy of VMI’s Jonathan E. Woodbridge

By Katie O’Halloran Brown
Published June 2, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

At Gettysburg, Life Imitates Art

A year before the “Children of the Battlefield” photo was taken from the body of Sgt. Amos Humiston, a similar drama unfolded in a poem

A year before the “Children of the Battlefield” photo was taken from the body of Sgt. Amos Humiston, a similar drama unfolded in a poem
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published June 2, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Highly Honorable and Strictly Confidential Service

Personal reminiscences of an Ohio farm boy who joined President Lincoln’s Bodyguard

By Scott Valentine
Published June 1, 2016

Uniforms & History

Gettysburg’s Damned Black-Hats and Other Distinctive Fellers

By the early summer of 1863, most of the unusually dressed soldiers in the Army of the Potomac had been fairly well shaken out in the throes of hard combat. Gone were the Bersaglieri uniforms of the 39th New York, the sky blue jackets of the 62nd Pennsylvania and the lances of the 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Some regiments and brigades, however, retained their original distinctive dress or adornments as the army marched north to their fateful encounter at Gettysburg.
By Michael J. McAfee
Published June 1, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Butterflies and Battle Scars

Exclusive images adapted from The Union Soldier: Images of the Civil War

Military Images
Published May 31, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Stragglers

Distinctive images from MI contributors

Selected images include federal soldiers subduing citizens, one of whom holds Greek Fire.
Military Images
Published May 31, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Last Shot

One of Berdan’s Boys

A member of the 2nd U.S. Sharpshooters shows off his recently issued Sharp’s rifle from his camp at Falmouth, Va., in June or July 1862.
Military Images
Published March 14, 2016

Table of Contents

Spring 2016: Vol. XXXIV, No. 2 (Whole Number 196)

Military Images
Published March 12, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Editor’s Desk

The Hidden Power of Microhistories

The rare tintypes of Jefferson and Varina Davis showcased in this issue share much in common with the portraits MI has long featured for its readers. Since 1979, we’ve published thousands of portrait photographs. Soldiers and sailors from all walks of life and of all ranks compose the vast majority of images, though likenesses of nurses, vivandières and patriotic persons have graced our pages. Some of these images include details about salient features, including dress, weapons and equipment. Others are accompanied by personal stories and biographical information.
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published March 11, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Passing in Review

Hidden History of Connecticut Union Soldiers by John Banks

George Marsh stares at the camera with an expression that suggests a contemplative person, who, perhaps, also possesses a dash of the mischievous, with an oversize bowtie framing his clean-shaven face. His portrait photograph resembles countless others inserted into fashionable carte de visite albums during the war. What makes this image quite unique is a newspaper clipping pasted below his likeness. It reads, in part, “He was lying on the ground when a ball entered the ground in front of him and came out of the earth a few feet from where he lay. The concussion caused his death, as he was not hit by any thing.”
Military Images
Published March 10, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

On the Eve of War

Previously unpublished portraits capture future Confederate Commander-In-Chief Jefferson Davis and first lady Varina Howell Davis

This tintype of Jefferson Davis may come the closest in showing us how he looked on the eve of a conflict that he had hoped to avoid.
By John O’Brien
Published March 9, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Absolute Truth of Photos

Reflections on the Davis Tintypes

Back in 1976 when we celebrated the Bicentennial of our declaration of independence from Britain, I was often asked why it was that during the ensuing commemoration of the Revolution more people were actually interested in the Civil War than in the people and events of 1775-1783. There were perhaps several answers, but the one that seemed most trenchant to me was the fact that we can actually see our Civil War ancestors at home, at leisure, and at war.
By William C. Davis
Published March 8, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

On the Eve of a Crossroads

Reflections on the Davis Tintypes

These photographs capture perfectly the dilemmas of Jefferson Davis and Varina Howell Davis in early 1861. Soon, they would depart Washington, D.C., where they had lived for many years, and head south for an uncertain destiny. In February 1861, Jefferson would be chosen President of the new Confederacy, a role he accepted as his duty. His wife Varina would begin what she later described as the worst years of her life—her tenure as Confederate first lady.
By Joan E. Cashin
Published March 7, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Custer’s West Virginia Red Ties

The Life and Times of the 3rd West Virginia Cavalry

One of the early cavalry companies to form in the loyal western counties of Virginia became the 3rd West Virginia Cavalry. They defended their home state and the rest of the Union against Confederate forces.
By Richard A. Wolfe
Published March 6, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Honored Few

Medal of Honor Recipient Hillary Beyer, 90th Pennsylvania Infantry

At Antietam on Sept. 17, 1862, an awful moment occurred when heavy Confederate artillery fire from the vicinity of the Dunker Church greeted the 90th Pennsylvania Infantry as it moved into the infamous Cornfield. The men and officers of the 90th advanced into a hail of rebel infantry fire and became hotly engaged. Men were hit and began to fall by the dozens. The federals on their left and right flanks gave way. Now outnumbered, the Pennsylvanians withdrew through the East Woods and on to the rear. A few of the men paused at the edge of the woods and looked back at the carnage in the Cornfield, only to glimpse an officer engaged in an act of heroism.
Military Images
Published March 5, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Great Outdoors

Civil War soldiers at work, rest and play

Images of soldiers pictured in camp, on campaign and other locations have always held a special interest for C. Paul Loane. “There is more going on than just the soldiers standing there,” Loane explains. “They are particularly helpful in seeing just what kind of environment the soldiers were in or what gear they really did use.”
C. Paul Loane
Published March 4, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Antebellum Warriors

Mexican War, Regulars & Militias: Unrecorded Fatigue Dress?

One finds it difficult to discern whether the subject of this portrait is a soldier or a civilian.
Military Images
Published March 3, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Held Hostage In Virginia

A Union captain becomes a casualty in a battle of wits between Jefferson Davis and John Pope

By Scott Valentine
Published March 2, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Union Wives and Their Generals

Nearly all the generals who served the North during the Civil War were married. Left behind at home, their wives cared for families, farms, businesses and relatives. A few accompanied their husbands into fields of action. Many generals seemed eager to have their betrothed with them as frequently as possible. And often, the wives of generals had greater access to headquarters than junior officers. A representative sample of portraits of these military couples.
By Tom Glass
Published March 1, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

“A Hideous Dream”

The tragic outcome of the Civil War for a Connecticut family with sons on both sides of the conflict

By John Banks
Published February 29, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Stragglers

Distinctive and unique images from MI contributors

Selected images include a Louisiana officer and a group of federal cavalrymen.
Military Images
Published February 28, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Photo Sleuth

Early Photo Sleuths In the Dead Letter Office

The Dead Letter Office clerks who worked to track down the recipients through skill, public participation, and even special laws to solve each mystery, stand among some of the earliest Civil War photo sleuths.
By Kurt Luther
Published February 27, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

An Album of Ardent Patriots

A small album of images recalls the patriotism of a band of brothers.

By Jim Hennessey
Published February 26, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

Words Exchanged in an Ambulance

Two wounded soldiers, one North and another South, find common ground on the way to an uncertain future

By Ronald S. Coddington
Published February 25, 2016

Uniforms & History

The Often Overlooked and Generally Underappreciated Union Staff Officer

The vital work of officers of both the General Staff and regimental staffs is often overlooked by the average Civil War buff, enamored by the blood and glory of battles.
By Michael J. McAfee
Published February 24, 2016 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Last Shot

Mocking Jefferson Davis

Artists mocked Jefferson Davis after he was captured wearing his wife’s overcoat.
Military Images
Published December 15, 2015

Table of Contents

Winter 2016: Vol. XXXIV, No. 1 (Whole Number 195)

Military Images
Published December 14, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Editor’s Desk

On the Power of Observation

History is improved by keen observation and scholarship. Take a close look at all the images published in this and other issues of MI. You just might change history.
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published December 13, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Passing in Review

An Illustrated look at New England’s Dizzying Array of Early War Uniforms

“Rally Round the Flag—Uniforms of the Union Volunteers of 1861: The New England States” by Ron Field
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published December 12, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Lexington, Not Petersburg

A new location for an iconic image of Gen. Robert E. Lee

A cancelled revenue stamp on the back of a well-known photo of Gen. Robert E. Lee and Traveller suggests a new location—and brings to light the photographers who took it
By John O’Brien
Published December 11, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Antebellum Warriors

Mexican War, Regulars & Militias: Massachusetts militiaman Hosea Ballot Ellis 

Prominent on his pompon-topped dress cap is a brass letter “H” surrounded by a laurel wreath. The letter may signify Ellis’s membership in the Hancock Light Guards, a militia company formed in Quincy in 1855.
Military Images
Published December 9, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Honored Few

Medal of Honor Recipient Milton Holland, 5th U.S. Colored Infantry

Brave. Aggressive. Fearless. Uncompromising. A writer once used these words to describe Milton Holland – leadership qualities that came into play when he and his regiment, the 5th U.S. Colored Infantry, went into action in Virginia along the front lines of Richmond and Petersburg in the autumn of 1864.
Military Images
Published December 8, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Men of Nerve

The 5th Massachusetts Cavalry in the Civil War

Capt. Andrew F. Chapman filled a photo album with cartes de visite of his comrades in the 5th Massachusetts Cavalry, one of only seven African-American cavalry regiments in the entire Union army during the Civil War. Selected images from the album, published here for the first time, illustrate the esprit de corps of its cadre of white officers. The inclusion of a single black trooper, posed in the same manner as his officers, speaks to emerging themes of democracy, equality and the individualism of the American soldier.
Story by James Paradis, Images from the Rick Carlile collection
Published December 7, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Thoughts on Private Booth

By J. Matthew Gallman
Published December 6, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Hidden Treasures

Inside the only museum in America dedicated solely to Civil War soldier images

Selected photographs from Ronn Palm’s Museum of Civil War Images in Gettysburg, Pa.
Military Images
Published December 5, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Photo Sleuth

How Fellow Collectors, Field Photos and Muttonchops Identified an Unknown Officer

In Civil War photo sleuthing, notes Kurt Luther, research is never really finished, only interrupted. Fresh clues or a new approach can restart an investigation at any time.
By Kurt Luther
Published December 4, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Assassination in Jackson County

A defender of Freedmen is murdered in Reconstruction Florida

The life and death of John Quincy Dickinson
By William Morgan-Palmer
Published December 3, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Soldier, Author, Bugler

The extraordinary life and lasting military legacy of Oliver Wilcox Norton

His Civil War service included the perils of combat, the joy of perfecting a classic bugle call and leading men of color into battle.
By Theodore J. Karle
Published December 2, 2015

Uniforms & History

The Hungarian Connection to the Union Army’s Official Hat

The Model 1858 uniform hat, nicknamed the “Hardee hat” or the “Jeff Davis hat,” also went by the moniker “Kossuth hat.”
By Michael J. McAfee
Published December 1, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

“Conquer We Must, For Our Cause Is Just”

How one captain paid for his support of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation with his life

Henry Willard Allen, 7th Illinois Infantry
By Kathleen Heyworth 
Published November 30, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Riding the Rail, Revisited

25 years after this unique photo made the rounds in books and film, the owner discovered its origins

During my college days in Salt Lake City almost 50 years ago, I would search antique shops looking for Civil War treasures, following my classes on most Fridays...
By Robert L. Kotchian
Published November 28, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Stragglers

Distinctive and unique images from MI contributors

Selected images include a Virginia Confederate critically wounded during Pickett’s Charge.
Military Images
Published November 27, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Backdrops of Benton Barracks

A survey of six painted canvases used by St. Louis photographers to bring soldiers into their studios

The size and location of St. Louis attracted an extraordinary assemblage of photographers, and the work they produced rivaled that produced in the larger, established Eastern cities.
By Mike Medhurst and Brian Boeve
Published November 26, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Dark Memories After Antietam

Lt. Bernard Blakeslee’s Desperate Fight Against “Soldier’s Heart”

“The Sixteenth was always called an unfortunate regiment; for if there was any special hardship to endure, the regiment was sure to be called on to experience it, either by accident or otherwise. It was our bad luck.”
By Scott Valentine
Published November 25, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

At Stones River, A Sword Lost and Found

The life and military service of Capt. Richard Mason Waterman, 31st Indiana Infantry

“When he was satisfied that his capture was a certainty he pulled his shoulder straps off and hid his sword and side arms.”
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published November 24, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Last Shot

Convenient Hat Stand

A post mortem photograph of a Union soldier who fell victim to disease.
Military Images
Published September 6, 2015

Passing in Review

“Images of America” Remembers the Civil War Soldier

If you thought that the “Images of America” books by Arcadia Publishing trace the history of the country through vernacular photography of small towns, think again. At least 45 Civil War-related volumes are in the series. If they are all as well produced as “Remembering Michigan,” make room in your library for the set.
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published September 6, 2015

Editor’s Desk

On Distinguishing Props from Personal Items

Though it may seem innocuous, the question of whether or not the musket a soldier carries or the uniform he wears actually belonged to him is a hot topic among those who study soldier portraits. At the heart of this debate lay an essential question: What is a prop?
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published September 6, 2015

Table of Contents

Autumn 2015: Vol. XXXIII, No. 4 (Whole Number 194)

Military Images
Published September 5, 2015

Photo Sleuth

Revealed: The Identity of an Officer in an Iconic Group Portrait

Kurt Luther describes his journey to determine the name of the white officer pictured in a lithograph of African American soldiers at Camp William Penn outside Philadelphia, Pa.
By Kurt Luther
Published September 5, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Love Found and Lost

A Photo Reawakens Passions Extinguished by War

154 years after war killed a budding romance between a Massachusetts boy on his way South to fight the war and a Pennsylvania farm girl began at a train station, a chance discovery brought their portraits together.
By Kevin D. Canberg
Published September 5, 2015

Palmetto Faces

South Carolinians at War

A survey of ambrotypes, cartes de visite and tintypes of militia and volunteers from South Carolina. They were the first troops to see service in the defense of the short-lived Republic of South Carolina in 1861 and some of the last to defend the Confederate States of America in 1865. During that time, about 17,000 South Carolinians soldiers died—almost a third of its male white population of fighting age.
By Ron Field
Published September 4, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Mistaken Identity?

Early Use of Photographic Evidence in Two Court-Martial Cases for Desertion

Two court-martial cases that arose at the end of the Civil War reveal how some litigants relied on more than the spoken word to determine identity.
By Elena Colón-Marrero
Published September 4, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Antebellum Warriors

Mexican War, Regulars & Militias

A second lieutenant from the King’s Mountain Military School in Yorkville, S.C.
Military Images
Published September 4, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Armed to the Teeth?

The Use of Prop Weapons in Civil War Studio Photography

Who is to say that the studio portrait of the fierce-looking Civil Warrior armed to the teeth did not include props? While obvious instances of props exist, a more challenging question to analyze involves the use of weapons as props.
By Katelyn Brown
Published September 4, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

“Glory to Stand Upon Some Lofty Pinnacle”

One North Carolinian’s Journey Through Political Turmoil to Death in Battle

Jesse Sharpe Barnes was killed in action as he led his company in the 4th North Carolina Infantry against a redoubt during the Battle of Seven Pines. on May 31, 1862.
By Katharina Schlichtherle
Published September 3, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

From the “Star” to the “Shenandoah”

Navy Lt. John Grimball Defended the Confederacy from Beginning to End

“Nothing less can be expected of true sons of the South.”
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published September 3, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

America’s Champion Aeronaut in the Civil War

Daredevil Balloonist John H. Steiner

Steiner was known as “one of the more colorful characters among the several aeronauts.”
By Sarah Hopkins
Published September 3, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Honored Few

Medal of Honor Recipients

Amidst the roar of battle at Trevilian Station, Va., on June 11, 1864, 1st Lt. Noble Delance Preston of the 10th New York Cavalry lay in a plowed field bleeding profusely.
Military Images
Published September 2, 2015

Uniforms & History

Cap Insignia: Topping It Off

The U.S. Army Regulations of 1861 were very specific on what trim should be placed on the 1858 forage cap, and yet no one seemed to follow the rules.
By Michael J. McAfee
Published September 2, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Tintype Stares and Regal Airs

Civil War Portrait Photography and Soldier Memorialization

“In this total war, the volunteer fighters secured a new individualized identity for the common soldier through portrait photographs.”
By Isidora Stankovic
Published September 2, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Stragglers

Distinctive and unique images from MI contributors

Selected images include a soldier from the Union 7th Maryland Infantry captured and sent to Andersonville.
Military Images
Published September 1, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Last Shot

He Lost His Last Battle

A post mortem photograph of a Union soldier who fell victim to disease.
Military Images
Published June 12, 2015

Table of Contents

Summer 2015: Vol. XXXIII, No. 3 (Whole Number 193)

Military Images
Published June 12, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Editor's Desk

On Colorizing Photographs

You will not find modern colorization techniques used in Military Images. The original tinting, bumps, bruises, scratches and dents are part of the history of the photograph and should be preserved.
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published June 12, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Passing in Review

Prominent Historians Focus on Memorable Photographs in Lens of War

Have you ever wondered how historians feel about the photographs they encounter as part of their profession? J. Matthew Gallman, Gary W. Gallagher and other prominent historians reveal their connections to iconic images.
By Ronald S. Coddington
Published June 11, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Stories Yet to Be Told

Artful Images from the Dan Schwab Collection

Dan Schwab appreciates the connection that old photos make to long lost volunteers in blue and gray. “When I hold an image in my hand, I know that the soldier in the image unquestionably at one time held that very piece of tin or glass in his hand as well. He most likely took great care of it so that it could be sent home to his parents, siblings, wife or a sweetheart.”
Published June 10, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

They Laid Down Their Lives for the Flag

6th U.S. Colored Infantry

Battle tested at Petersburg, Va., the men and officers of the 6th U.S. Colored Infantry proved able fighters.
By Candice Zollars
Published June 10, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Unadorned Backdrops

Photographers in camp and other temporary locations usually left their elaborately painted backdrops at home in the studio. Big and expensive, these scenic environments were not desirable travel companions. Camera operators instead used what they had on hand—canvas, sheets and blankets—as makeshift backgrounds. A survey of selected soldier portraits shows how they were used.
Military Images
Published June 10, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Honored Few

Medal of Honor Recipients

During the Battle of Fair Oaks, Va., in 1862, Union Surg. Gabriel Grant risked his life to save the wounded—and he received the nation's highest military honor for his actions.
Military Images
Published June 10, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Cruel Twist of Fate

A Confederate is imprisoned with the men he was sent to save

Federals in Memphis ignored Surg. Richard Walter Scott Martin's flag of truce and locked him up in notorious Irving Block Prison.
By Scott Valentine
Published June 10, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

“Headquarters for Pictures”

The Life and Times of Tennessee Photographer Theodore M. Schleier

By Steven Karnes and Ronald S. Coddington
Published June 10, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Tintype

That Proved a Pension Claim

In 1923, David Warrington posthumously supported his youngest daughter with a photo he had taken almost 60 years earlier.
By Andrew L. Slap
Published June 9, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Photo Sleuth

The Photo Sleuth’s Digital Toolkit

Choosing the right tool is essential for any job, and Kurt Luther details what you need to carry in your digital research toolkit.
By Kurt Luther
Published June 9, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Antebellum Warriors

Mexican War, Regulars & Militias

The “Hero of Little Round Top” during his days as lieutenant of cadets at West Point.
Military Images
Published June 8, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Stragglers

Distinctive and unique images from MI contributors

Images include a father and son from Tennessee, a Georgia infantryman from the Stephens Home Guard and a pair of New York cavalrymen.
Military Images
Published June 8, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

Uniforms & History

“Like a Regiment of Quakers”

The uniforms of the The 1st Regiment, Philadelphia Reserve Brigade (Gray Reserves), a unique home guard brigade formed in 1861.
By Michael J. McAfee
Published June 7, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Last Shot

"Jeff Davis and the South"

Joseph C. White of the 12th Mississippi Infantry holds a placard that leaves no doubt about his loyalties.
Military Images
Published May 28, 2015 • Buy for Subscription Only

The Path From Confirmation Bias to Airtight Identification

Tips from how to move from a state of confirmation bias to a solid identification.
By Kurt Luther